When We Were Alone

Illustrated By: Julie Flett

A young girl notices things about her grandmother that make her curious. Why does her grandmother have long, braided hair and beautifully coloured clothing? Why does she speak Cree and spend so much time with her family? As she asks questions, her grandmother shares her experiences in a residential school, when these things were taken away.

Where Did You Get Your Moccasins?

Illustrated By: Herman Bekkering

When a boy wears his new moccasins to a city school, his classmates want to know all about them. Readers will learn who Kookum is, where leather comes from, and how leather is traditionally prepared for moccasins.

Share this book with beginning readers to practise the important pre-reading concepts of rhythm and repetition.

I Am Not a Number

When eight-year-old Irene is removed from her First Nations family to live in a residential school she is confused, frightened, and homesick. She tries to remember who she is and where she came from. When she goes home for the summer, her parents decide never to send her and her brothers away again. But what will happen when they disobey the law?

The Matatu

When Kioko sees the village dogs chase after the matatu, his grandfather tells him an African folktale about a dog, a goat and a sheep that explains why the dogs behave as they do.

A Tattle-tell Tale

Illustrated By: Qin Leng

Joseph doesn’t want to tattle, but a lunchroom bully won’t leave him alone. With the help of his principal, he learns the difference between tattling and telling.

Sign Up Here

Illustrated By: Qin Leng

It seems like every kid in Dee-Dee’s class has joined a club but her. Dee-Dee knows that good friends shouldn’t leave each other out, so she comes up with a plan to start a club that everyone can join.

Being Me

Illustrated By: Yvonne Cathcart

Rosie the Red knows that you don’t have to be an adult to make a difference in your community. In Being Me, Rosie finds a way to volunteer at the local food bank and tries to make her classmate Sam feel less embarrassed about the fact that his family uses it.

I Can't Have Bannock but the Beaver Has a Dam

Illustrated By: Herman Bekkering

This beloved Indigenous classic begins when a little boy asks, “Mom, can I have some bannock?” Despite having all the ingredients, Mom can’t make bannock.

Children will be eager to chime in as Mom answers the little boy’s questions about the power outage in their community and how it impacts his family. Includes a bannock recipe!