I Want to Be...

Some jobs immediately sound fun—Candy Maker?! And some jobs sound exciting—Oceanographer! And some jobs—Wind Farmer—sound so wonderful it’s hard to believe that they exist! This ABC explores some of the amazing and unusual jobs that people do. The illustrations of girls full of joy and wonder show us how we can be anything we want to be.

I Am Violet

A little girl looks around her and sees that people come in a rainbow of colors. Her mom is red, her dad is blue, and she is a wonderful mix of her mom and dad. The little girl announces: I am proud to be both. I am proud to be me! I am Violet!

The Train

Illustrated By: Georgia Lesley

Ashley meets her great-uncle by the old train tracks near their community in Nova Scotia. When she sees his sadness, he tells her of the day when he and the other children were taken to residential school, their lives changed forever. Uncle also explains how Ashley gives him hope. She promises to wait with him in remembrance of what was lost.

Since Joel

When the unimaginable loss of a child becomes reality: a mother's moving portrait of loving, raising, and losing a son with an Autism Spectrum Disorder.

My Name is Konisola

On a winter night nine-year-old Konisola and her mother step off a plane in Canada. They are running for their lives. Soon after they land Konisola’s mother becomes sick, and Konisola is forced to fend for herself. Will she be allowed to stay in Canada as a refugee? Or will she and her mother be sent back across the ocean? Inspired by a true story.

Inside Broadside

Edited By: Philinda Masters

Inside Broadside looks at the impact 1980s feminist newspaper Broadside: A Feminist Review had on the lives of both the women who participated in its creation and the women who read one or all of its 96 issues.

The Oracle of Cumae

Mariuccia Umbellino must rescue an ancient oracle that is set to be destroyed on orders from the Pope. In the ensuing adventure things are blown up, love spells are miscast, a housekeeper poisons her cruel mistress, a mummy is discovered, and the mysterious fate of a jettatore—a person born with the Evil Eye—is revealed.

Just Lucky

After her grandfather dies and her grandmother can no longer take care of her, fifteen-year-old Lucky must navigate the foster care system. Lucky soon learns that foster placements are lonely, some can even be dangerous, and none of them feel like home.

The Stone Rainbow

Seventeen-year-old Jack Pedersen is finding life complicated ever since coming out. Complications go into hyper-drive when a new student arrives at school, and Jack starts experiencing feelings that he’s never allowed himself before.

The Brave Princess and Me

Illustrated By: Juliana Kolesova

In 1943 Greece, young Tilde Cohen and her mother are Jewish and on the run from the Nazis. When they arrive unannounced on Princess Alice’s doorstep, begging her to shelter them, the Princess’s kindness is put to the test. Based on the true story.

Our Future

Profiles of ten young activists taking on the key issues of our times. From racism to cyber bullying, from gun violence to animal protection, they don’t let their youth stop them from being heard.

Gaawin Gindaaswin Ndaawsii / I Am Not a Number

The dual language edition, in Nishnaabemwin (Ojibwe) Nbisiing dialect and English, of the award-winning book I Am Not a Number. When eight-year-old Irene is removed from her First Nations family to live in a residential school she is confused, frightened, and homesick. She tries to remember who she is and where she came from.

A Friend Like Iggy

Photographs by: Ian Richards

Iggy is a specially trained dog who offers support to children who have experienced abuse and trauma. For police interviews, counseling, and court readiness, Iggy is there to make things easier and to let them know they are not alone.

Skateboard Sibby

Never one to back down, when Freddie challenges Sibby to a competition on the half pipe, she accepts. No skateboard, no equipment, and a loss of confidence are just some of the obstacles she has to deal with.

Two Firsts

Bertha Wilson and Claire L’Heureux-Dubé were the first women judges on the Supreme Court of Canada, polar opposites in background and temperament, the two faced many identical challenges.