Ga's / The Train

  • Translated by: Joe Wilmot
    Illustrated By: Georgia Lesley
  • Pages:36
  • Publisher:Second Story Press
  • Themes:Residential Schools, Mi'gmaq, Indigenous, Grandparents, Reconciliation
  •  
  • Pub Date:09/21/2021
  • Age Groups:Fiction Picture Book
Hardcover
9781772602005
$19.95

The dual-language edition, in English and Mi'gmaq, of the Silver Birch Express-nominated title, The Train.

Ashley meets her great-uncle by the old train tracks near their community in Nova Scotia. Ashley sees his sadness, and Uncle tells her of the day years ago when he and the other children from their community were told to board the train before being taken to residential school where their lives were changed forever. They weren't allowed to speak Mi'gmaq and were punished if they did. There was no one to give them love and hugs and comfort. Uncle also tells Ashley how happy she and her sister make him. They are what give him hope. Ashley promises to wait with her uncle by the train tracks, in remembrance of what was lost.

"While the Mi’kmaq text is twice as large as the English script, the two languages share space, but use different fonts ... The space dedicated to the text of the story anticipates an experienced reader who can appreciate the yarn of loss told in all the words, in both languages. Every picture tells a story in a style best described as crayon realism, but they do convey a metanarrative of affection between the lead characters."

– Jury statement from the Indigenous Voices Award
Emphasizing sensory details in the present day, the prose is straightforward; Uncle’s traumatic experiences are gently worded for the picture book audience. Lesley’s pastel-like drawings, rendered in a light color palette, vividly capture the story’s emotions in multiple close-ups of Indigenous characters. But it’s Wilmot’s side-by-side Mi’gmaq translation that leaves the deepest impression of the language and culture that was lost—and, thankfully, regained for Ashley’s generation.
– Publishers Weekly

"A powerful and distinctive residential-school story."

– Cooperative Children's Book Center (CCBC)

“The space dedicated to the text of the story anticipates an experienced reader who can appreciate the yarn of loss told in all the words, in both languages. Every picture tells a story in a style best described as crayon realism, but they do convey a metanarrative of affection between the lead characters.”

– Indigenous Voices Award Jury statement
Forest of Reading - Silver Birch Express   | 2021  |  Short-listed
New Brunswick Book Award - Alice Kitts Memorial Award for Excellence in Children’s Writing   | 2021  |  Short-listed
Indigenous Voices Award - Published Work in an Indigenous Language   | 2022  |  Short-listed
Canadian Children's Book Centre's Best Books for Kids & Teens, Spring 2022   | 2022  |  Short-listed